Bill Holder

William Holder ¹75 is editor of Wesleyan magazine.

Critical Care

DR. JOSEPH J. FINS ’82 WAS A FIRST-YEAR FELLOW in general internal medicine in New York when Eunice Thomas*, a black woman from Guyana with a problem-plagued medical history, was wheeled in by her daughter, Jennifer. Stroke, chronic lung disease, congestive heart failure, and rheumatoid arthritis had left her sound in mind but slow in speech.…

Raising Sites: The Growth of Online News

CAROLINE LITTLE ’81 BROKE THE RULES. The rules, for example, that say a woman starting a high-powered career would be crazy to get married and have children at the outset, never mind deciding to work part time. But that’s exactly what Little did. She married at age 22 (“my friends were appalled”), then she had her…

NESCAC Fights the Trend

AT 4:30 P.M. ON A FEBRUARY AFTERNOON, the fitness rooms in the Freeman Athletic Center are jammed. Forget about getting on one of the two newest machines, $4,500 elliptical cross trainers that let you simulate running up hills. Just finding a free exercise bike or a set of weights can be difficult. Barely more than…

The Gentle Whirring of a New Heart

ROCKY’S ITALIAN GRILL OVERLOOKS A WIDE EXPANSE of the Ohio River and, rising from the opposite bank, the skyline of Louisville, Kentucky. One mid-October day at this popular eatery, Robert Tools, a 59-year-old former telephone worker, ordered a meatball grinder–an unexceptional act that didn’t distinguish him from any other patron except for one remarkable fact: while…

Retailing In Style

JACK MITCHELL ’61 LOOKS UP FROM A CONVERSATION as an irrepressible saleswoman bursts into his office with a story she can’t resist telling at that very moment. A local woman, not someone who shops a great deal, was astonished when a limo showed up at her door, courtesy of her husband. The driver escorted her to…

“Mr. Social Security” Battles On

ONE OF THE MOST FORMIDABLE OPPONENTS TO PRESIDENT BUSH’S controversial proposal for partially privatizing Social Security can be found not on Capitol Hill, nor among lobbyists, nor among liberal think tanks in Washington. In a modest suburban house overlooking the Potomac River, not far from George Washington’s estate at Mount Vernon, Bob Ball ’35 is on…

The Art of Selection

When museum curators trade stories, Alan Shestack ’60 has one for the hall of fame.Everyone, it seemed, wanted to see the Vermeer exhibit at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., where Shestack is chief curator and deputy director. The known works by this 17th–century Dutch master number a scant 35, and for the…

A Genius for Water

Even by the standards of rural northern Idaho, East Hope is barely a blip on the map. Home to Claudia Stearns, widow of Harold Stearns ’21, this village of 200 souls has little more than a tiny post office to mark its existence by the highway on the edge of Lake Pend Oreille, a remnant…

CSS & COL: Looking Good at 40

The College of Letters celebrated its 40th anniversary September 22–23 with a gathering of faculty and alumni who reminisced about their past experiences in the program. William Blakemore ’65, a correspondent for ABC News, was among the speakers. He recalled a cold January morning 37 years ago when he and a dozen or so fellow…