Features

TOWARD A GENTLER DEATH: A Q&A WITH KATY BUTLER ’71

In Knocking on Heaven’s Door: The Path to a Better Way of Death, a New York Times Notable Book of 2013, award-winning journalist Katy Butler ’71 recounted shepherding her parents, Professor Emeritus of History Jeffrey Butler and artist Valerie Butler, through their final illnesses. When Butler’s father suffered a stroke and later was given a…

THE POLICY ENTREPRENEUR, BY GABRIEL POPKIN ’03

   One federal program provides health coverage to a fifth of all Americans and more than a third of all children. It covers nearly half of all births. It consumes more than $500 billion annually, almost as much as the Pentagon. Without it, many more American women and infants would die or get sick during…

HEALTHCARE AND RACISM: A TOXIC MIX

 Recasting Metabolic Syndrome Associate Professor of Science in Society Anthony Hatch, who has been living with type 1 diabetes for more than 25 years, is in a unique position to write about metabolic syndrome, a cluster of conditions that include elevated blood sugar. Usually prevalent in developed nations—the CDC puts the U.S. rate at nearly…

THE CYBORG LIFE: HEALTHCARE AND RACISM

The Cyborg Team.’ That’s what Sonya Sternlieb ’18 and I call our work with Professor Hatch,” says Julia Gordon ’18 (above left), a Science in Society Program and biology double major. Mentored by Hatch, Gordon is writing an honors thesis and, with Sternlieb (right), an American studies and biology major, has collaborated on two papers…

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT WESLEYAN HISTORY (NOT REALLY…)

To walk Wesleyan’s campus is to be surrounded by history that whispers from buildings. Presidents left their mark (or didn’t), legendary faculty built Wesleyan’s reputation, controversies raged, student life underwent seismic upheavals—all making Wesleyan what it is today. In the following pages we recount selected points of that evolution, drawing heavily on the insightful histories…

AMERICA’S LONG, DARK LOVE AFFAIR WITH GUNS: 2017 SHASHA SEMINAR, BY JIM H. SMITH

At this year’s Shasha Seminar for Human Concerns on “Guns in American Society,” John Feinblatt ’73, president of Everytown for Gun Safety, the nation’s largest gun violence prevention organization, offered guests an insider’s view of the new politics of gun safety.  As featured speaker at the Friday dinner, he discussed the recent successes of gun…

ORAL HISTORIES, BY CHRISTINE FOSTER

In the 1960s, Wesleyan began to grow from a small college into a somewhat bigger, more diverse university. Scores of young faculty members arrived during this era and many stayed for decades, building careers, starting families, and shaping the institution into what it is today. More than 50 years later, as these faculty grow older…