Features

The Mysterious Art of Teaching

The award-winning author of the novel Edinburgh reflects on returning to campus as a visiting writer.BY ALEXANDER CHEE ’89 I GRADUATED FROM WESLEYAN IN 1989 as an English major with a B+ average and returned in the fall of 2002 as a visiting writer after the publication of my first novel. Being here again has been…

New Ideas Infuse the Curriculum

The Wesleyan campaign has supported an initiative to hire 20 new faculty members who have brought a stimulating variety of new ideas and new courses.BARRY CHERNOFF CAN BE A HARD GUY TO REACH when classes are not in session. His work as an environmental scientist bent on saving ecosystems from destruction takes him to remote areas…

Common Song for An Uncommon Film

ON A JUNE EVENING IN 2002, ethnomusicologist Tim Eriksen M.A. ’93 got a call that changed his life. He and his wife, fellow ethnomusicologist Mirjana (Minja) Lausevic Ph.D. ’98, were living in Minneapolis. She was a professor at the University of Minnesota. He had a solo singing career and was lead singer/guitarist in a folk-punk…

Uproar Over Act of Conscience

EVEN AFTER ALL THE REHEARSAL AND PREPARATION, Ari Silver-Isenstadt ’90 still didn’t know what he would actually do that morning in the operating room when he faced the ethical dilemma he’d been dreading. Certainly, he never imagined that a brief confrontation with a surgeon would derail his medical education and set him on a course…

A Fading Taboo?

SINCE HER EARLY YEARS GROWING UP IN SUBURBS OF CLEVELAND, Associate Professor of History and African American Studies Renee Romano has been a keen observer of racial relations in this country—and in her own daily life. This lifelong interest led her both to a teaching career and to her new book, Race Mixing: Black-White Marriage in…

Wesleyan’s Building Boom

IN 1876 WESLEYAN ACQUIRED ITS FIRST LAWN MOWER. The front of North College, formerly a meadow, became a well-trimmed lawn with mature, beautiful trees. From a small collection of brownstone buildings, the campus would evolve toward an environment of open space, walkways, and architectural projects that, in each generation, revealed a great deal about the priorities…

Preventing Fatal Medical Errors

WHEN SUZANNE DELBANCO ’89 WAS 14 YEARS OLD, her cousin Debbie went into a hospital to have a broken nose fixed. An undetected genetic condition predisposed Debbie to react to general anesthesia with a dangerous and sustained increase in body temperature, which led to a coma. Had her doctors recognized in a timely way what…

Chasing the Widow-Maker

ALAN MILLER ’76, INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER FOR THE LOS ANGELES TIMES,was searching for a story that would make readers put down their coffee. He wanted his words to change lives. He had won awards—though not yet the coveted Pulitzer—for his reporting on the Clinton/Gore campaign finance scandal, a story he broke in 1996 and pursued for three…

Embedded

THE BROAD OUTCOME OF THE WAR IN IRAQ may not be known for years, but in one aspect the results are already clear. The long-standing antagonism between the military and media over war coverage is dramatically changed. The Pentagon’s experiment with attaching an unprecedented 775 reporters to military units has been so widely hailed by both…

View From One Year Out

GRADUATING FROM WESLEYAN MADE JIMIN LEE NERVOUS.A few days before Commencement 2002, she sat on a chair in front of Klekolo World Coffee near Main Street. The afternoon was sunny and warm, Middletown teenagers lounged in packs across the street, and Lee, a biology major with a backpack still stuffed, expected her family on campus…