Features

Campaign Artistry

THE SHUTTER CLICKS AND BROOKS KRAFT ’87 CAPTURES President George W. Bush whispering in the ear of Senator Ted Kennedy, the president’s hand lightly resting on the senator’s shoulder as both men smile. It’s a quintessential Bush moment: a touch of personal charm delivered while other Senate leaders are milling about. “Hands Across the Aisle,” says…

What’s Eating Us?

“A LOT OF PEOPLE THINK EATING DISORDERS are based in vanity,” says Professor of Psychology Ruth Striegel-Moore. “Bulimia is ‘the stupid thing vain women do.’ But they’re really disorders of identity.” That crucial insight lay well in her future when Striegel-Moore, as an undergraduate, accompanied her mentor on a visit to a hospital ward for patients…

Critical Care

DR. JOSEPH J. FINS ’82 WAS A FIRST-YEAR FELLOW in general internal medicine in New York when Eunice Thomas*, a black woman from Guyana with a problem-plagued medical history, was wheeled in by her daughter, Jennifer. Stroke, chronic lung disease, congestive heart failure, and rheumatoid arthritis had left her sound in mind but slow in speech.…

Fire Fights

THE HELICOPTER CIRCLES THE FIRE in the Sky Lakes Wilderness area of Oregon. The “spotter” on board identifies a break in the trees where firefighters can rappel down. With the side doors open, the roar of the helicopter rotors and the howling wind makes conversation impossible. The crew uses hand signals to alert Sarah Berns ’98 and her…

The Art and Craft of Location

OCCASIONALLY A NIGHT’S WORTH OF RAIN will come through Los Angeles and clear away the smog. It’s then possible to see Downtown from Hollywood, the mountains from Downtown. Homes in the hills are visible for the first time in months and the landscape appears in bas-relief in the rearview mirror. This is the perfect day to explore…

Playing Politics

YOU MIGHT THINK THAT BRADLEY WHITFORD ’81, award-winning actor on NBC’s The West Wing, could take a lunch break that lasted as long as he wanted. But his beeper goes off and immediately he’s due back on the set, despite the half-eaten tuna sandwich in front of him at the WB commissary (a linen-napkin-and-fresh-sliced-fruit sort of…

Celluloid’s Successor

AS AN ARTIST WORKING ON THE EXPERIMENTAL EDGE OF HIS MEDIUM, Paul Kaiser ’78 challenges people. His medium—computer-generated “virtual film”—is hot in cinema (think Toy Story or Spider-Man), but his work is as far from the box office as his New York apartment is from Hollywood. Based in the study of movement, his digital creations are…

Raising Sites: The Growth of Online News

CAROLINE LITTLE ’81 BROKE THE RULES. The rules, for example, that say a woman starting a high-powered career would be crazy to get married and have children at the outset, never mind deciding to work part time. But that’s exactly what Little did. She married at age 22 (“my friends were appalled”), then she had her…

Motherhood Mysteries

THE PHONE STARTED RINGING…AND RINGING AND RINGING. A jury had just pronounced O.J. Simpson not guilty of murder and from penitentiaries across California, convicts were calling Ayelet Waldman ’86 demanding she get them off. On the other end of the phone Waldman was understanding, sympathetic even, but she had a more immediate issue to deal with.…

NESCAC Fights the Trend

AT 4:30 P.M. ON A FEBRUARY AFTERNOON, the fitness rooms in the Freeman Athletic Center are jammed. Forget about getting on one of the two newest machines, $4,500 elliptical cross trainers that let you simulate running up hills. Just finding a free exercise bike or a set of weights can be difficult. Barely more than…