2016 ISSUE 1

GEOLOGIST TO GOVERNOR: LIVING THE OPPOSITE OF WOE

Irrepressibly optimistic, funny, self-deprecating, at times self-doubting but driven to tackle difficult challenges. These are the qualities that shine through in John Hickenlooper ’74’s disarming autobiography, The Opposite of Woe: My Life in Beer and Politics (with Maximillan Potter; Penguin Press, 2016). It was in a moment of self-doubt, or perhaps profound personal insight, that…

WESLEYAN RESPONDS TO SYRIAN REFUGEE CRISIS

Last fall President Roth took what some thought was a risk. Appalled by the Syrian refugee crisis, he issued a challenge to the Wesleyan community, asking what can we do? How would people respond? Would they say that’s not Wesleyan’s business? Ask why this crisis and not another? Demand more of Wesleyan than it could…

GRATITUDE FOR THE LATE PROFESSOR FIRSHEIN

I was very sad to hear the obituary news about my mentor, adviser, and friend, Professor Bill Firshein. I worked in Bill’s lab for two years and did my senior thesis with him, and I was one of the first students to graduate with Honors from the newly formed MB&B Department, which Bill founded in 1986.…

KUDOS TO DR. MICHAEL GREENBERG ’76

Flipping through Issue 3, 2015, I came across the Newsmaker profile of Michael Greenberg ’76, PhD, in the Class Notes. The writeup was appropriately congratulatory, but he deserves so, so much more. Among other disorders, Dr. Greenberg’s lab is currently working on Rett Syndrome, a single gene disorder affecting girls almost exclusively. Silently lurking, Rett…

COMMENT ON PEDAGOGICAL INNOVATION

For a retired physician now in my second career as an instructor in biology at the undergraduate level this article was of great practical interest. I often tell my students that a good indicator of how well they understand a concept is their ability to explain it to another student. I wish we had the…

ARGUS CONTROVERSY

Black Lives Matter. It was interesting to note the differing reactions of Wesleyan students to an Argus article using those words (Wesleyan, 2015, issue 3, page 13). It is not my intention to come down on either side of the controversy. What interests me most is the way in which those opposed to the op-ed…

9/11 TRAUMA RESPONSE RELEVANT TO OTHER GROUPS

Reading the article on Clifford Chanin ’75 (“The 9/11 Memory Keeper,” Wesleyan, Issue 3, 2015) and his discussion of the intersection of trauma response, I was struck by how closely this correlates with the experience of Americans of African descent and Native Americans. “[T]he cultural/political turmoil in societies that had difficult economies and younger populations…

EDITOR’S NOTE: WHAT OUR READERS SAY

I was a young reporter for the Middletown Press when it moved from its hole-in-the-wall location on the north end of Main Street to a new building on the south end that would have been the envy of any small-city newspaper. Little did I know that I had seen the paper at its zenith during my…

SCHOLAR ATHLETE: SU PARDO ’16

Su Pardo ’16, pitcher for the Wesleyan softball team, is majoring in classical studies and economics. “I’d taken four years of Latin in high school,” she explains. “Economics, however, was a foreign concept, but I really liked how applicable it is in the world today. I’m also very math-oriented, so I like synthesizing data and…

JUST PUBLISHED

Alexander Chee ‘89 Queen of the Night Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016 Alexander Chee’s long-anticipated follow-up to his Whiting Award–winning debut, Edinburgh (2001), is an operatic epic as rich and soaring as his protagonist’s voice: a rare “falcon” soprano. Set in 19th-century Paris, Queen of the Night tells the story of Lilliet Berne, an American orphan…