Features

ESPN’S ROB KING ’84 KNOWS EVERYONE’S FAVORITE TEAMS

Rob King ’84 is ESPN’s senior VP in charge of original content newsgathering and digital media. The Associated Press and global journalism’s Poynter Institute boast his presence on their boards. What insights does he have that others hope he’ll share? It’s a Monday afternoon in June and we’re sitting in Rob King’s corner office at…

ALUMNI PANEL: WHAT’S REALLY GOING ON IN JOURNALISM TODAY

During Reunion & Commencement 2018 a panel of four alumni presented a Celebration of Wesleyan Writing WESeminar “Practicing Journalism in a Time of Fake News,” organized by University Professor of English Anne Greene, coordinator of the Writing Certificate and the Kim-Frank Visiting Writers program. Excerpts from the conversation are below: Hannah Dreier: I went to…

A LIFELINE FOR LOCAL JOURNALISM, BY GABRIEL POPKIN ’03

At the Lenfest Institute CEO Jim Friedlich ’79, P’17 nurtures smaller newsrooms for the larger good of our democracy. When I was growing up in Lexington, Kentucky, waaaaay back in the 1980s, there was no Facebook and no Twitter. There were no websites. Instead, there was the Lexington Herald-Leader. It arrived at our door every…

THE HARD TRUTHS OF INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING

  Thirty years ago, Jenifer McKim ’88, walked into a news room in San Juan, Puerto Rico, and “fell in love,” she recalls. “I loved the idea of interviewing people, asking questions, and learning every day—and making a difference. One of the first stories I wrote was about a homeless family. The next day the…

FROM GLASS CEILINGS TO GLOWING SCREENS

Jane Eisner ’77, P’06,’12 and daughter Miriam Berger ’12 discuss the profession that is their shared passion. Jane Eisner ’77 is editor-in-chief of The Forward, the national Jewish news organization. Together with Mark Berger ’76, she is the proud parent of Miriam ’12 and her two older sisters, Rachel ’06 and Amalia (Tufts ’10). Miriam…

TOWARD A GENTLER DEATH: A Q&A WITH KATY BUTLER ’71

In Knocking on Heaven’s Door: The Path to a Better Way of Death, a New York Times Notable Book of 2013, award-winning journalist Katy Butler ’71 recounted shepherding her parents, Professor Emeritus of History Jeffrey Butler and artist Valerie Butler, through their final illnesses. When Butler’s father suffered a stroke and later was given a…

THE POLICY ENTREPRENEUR, BY GABRIEL POPKIN ’03

   One federal program provides health coverage to a fifth of all Americans and more than a third of all children. It covers nearly half of all births. It consumes more than $500 billion annually, almost as much as the Pentagon. Without it, many more American women and infants would die or get sick during…

HEALTHCARE AND RACISM: A TOXIC MIX

 Recasting Metabolic Syndrome Associate Professor of Science in Society Anthony Hatch, who has been living with type 1 diabetes for more than 25 years, is in a unique position to write about metabolic syndrome, a cluster of conditions that include elevated blood sugar. Usually prevalent in developed nations—the CDC puts the U.S. rate at nearly…

THE CYBORG LIFE: HEALTHCARE AND RACISM

The Cyborg Team.’ That’s what Sonya Sternlieb ’18 and I call our work with Professor Hatch,” says Julia Gordon ’18 (above left), a Science in Society Program and biology double major. Mentored by Hatch, Gordon is writing an honors thesis and, with Sternlieb (right), an American studies and biology major, has collaborated on two papers…