Features

Preventing Fatal Medical Errors

WHEN SUZANNE DELBANCO ’89 WAS 14 YEARS OLD, her cousin Debbie went into a hospital to have a broken nose fixed. An undetected genetic condition predisposed Debbie to react to general anesthesia with a dangerous and sustained increase in body temperature, which led to a coma. Had her doctors recognized in a timely way what…

Chasing the Widow-Maker

ALAN MILLER ’76, INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER FOR THE LOS ANGELES TIMES,was searching for a story that would make readers put down their coffee. He wanted his words to change lives. He had won awards—though not yet the coveted Pulitzer—for his reporting on the Clinton/Gore campaign finance scandal, a story he broke in 1996 and pursued for three…

Embedded

THE BROAD OUTCOME OF THE WAR IN IRAQ may not be known for years, but in one aspect the results are already clear. The long-standing antagonism between the military and media over war coverage is dramatically changed. The Pentagon’s experiment with attaching an unprecedented 775 reporters to military units has been so widely hailed by both…

View From One Year Out

GRADUATING FROM WESLEYAN MADE JIMIN LEE NERVOUS.A few days before Commencement 2002, she sat on a chair in front of Klekolo World Coffee near Main Street. The afternoon was sunny and warm, Middletown teenagers lounged in packs across the street, and Lee, a biology major with a backpack still stuffed, expected her family on campus…

Made From Scratch

AS THE CROWD TRICKLES IN TO A TRENDY MANHATTAN NIGHT CLUB, Jahi Sundance Lake ’01, one of New York’s hottest young deejays, lugs two steel crates and a satchel stuffed with LPs up the stairs to the loft where he’ll perform for the next two hours. These 170 records—a small part of his 7,000-album collection—were selected…

What Dot Bomb?

ON AN AVERAGE WEEK you might find Allan Baer ’76 noodling out a proposal in his rural Chelsea, Vt., office, pitching his ideas for telecommunications “beyond the grid” to White House bureaucrats, or out in the field anywhere from Uganda to Venezuela, where he’s bringing telecom capabilities to people in developing countries. The offices of Clay…

Harrah’s Full House

GARY LOVEMAN ’82 WAS HAVING DINNER on the mezzanine level of Harrah’s showcase casino, the Rio in Las Vegas, but unlike the hundreds of people gathered below him at card tables or slot machines, he wasn’t having fun. He’d ordered pasta but didn’t receive a pasta spoon. The waiter, though friendly, forgot to offer bottled water.…

After the Bubble Burst…

AS EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT OF SOFTWARE FOR SUN MICROSYSTEMS, Jonathan Schwartz ’87 would like to simplify modern life without sacrificing the conveniences of technology. He’d like to use his cell phone to get a Coke at a soda machine. With the same phone he’d like to open his car, his house, and the door to…

Marco Polo: A Photographer’s Journey

MICHAEL YAMASHITA ’71 STARTED TAKING PHOTOGRAPHS WHILE “SEARCHING FOR HIS ROOTS” on a trip to Japan after graduating from Wesleyan. What began as a hobby transformed into an ongoing career that combines his two passions of photography and travel. Since 1979 he has been a regular contributor to National Geographic magazine. His assignments have taken him to six…

Smoke Signals

ALDOUS HUXLEY AND GEORGE BURNS HAD AT LEAST ONE THING IN COMMON: Both believed a good cigar is essential to happiness. Huxley said a cigar is “much more lasting than love, so much less costly in emotional wear and tear.” But how should one choose a good cigar? Joyce Jacobsen and Peter Kilby, both professors of…